game design, code, writing, art and music

Why I'm using my own 3D game engine

In 2017 I created a 3D game engine called YUME and shipped a game with it called Speebot. Today, I am still using the same engine to make my next game.

I originally wrote the engine partly as a learning experience, partly as an experiment. People sometimes ask me why do I keep using it, instead of switching to something popular like Unity or Unreal. I mentioned some of my reasons in the past, but thought that I should write a concise post answering that question.

New Phantom Path demo version

A new version of the demo is now available for Windows! You can download it at itch.io, Gamejolt or IndieDB.

The new demo features the same levels as before, but with some new graphical changes, lore additions, and user experience improvements.

The development of the game is progressing steadily, but the planned release is moved to early 2020. There will be more information available soon!

New art style

About a week ago I accidentally applied a gradient texture to in-game trees, and liked it.

Inspired, I've decided to retouch my current graphics in a general way. My aim was to keep the feel and aesthetic of the original vision, but enrich it with more detail and subtle visual effects. So far I'm happy with the results.

The new art style looks something like this:

The trees are now more prominent when lit, and gradually fade into darkness.
The trees are now more prominent when lit, and gradually fade into darkness.
The
The "silhouette effect" of the original art style still remains.
Other props around the environment have also been retouched.
Other props around the environment have also been retouched.

In other news: a playable demo of Phantom Path is coming soon!

The demo will include the first few areas of the game, with all their secrets, lore and original soundtrack.